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Feb
11
2021
Add to Calendar 02/11/2021 12:30 PM 02/11/2021 02:00 PM America/New_York Resilience 2021: The Hidden Costs of Environmental Savings from Remote Work

While reduced activity associated with the COVID-19 lockdowns is expected to cut carbon emissions by 4-7% this year, the decrease is insignificant in the long run. According to Oksana Tarasova, WMO Chief of Atmospheric and Environment Research Division, although it looked like the pandemic had brought the world to a standstill, carbon emissions continued almost unabated because lockdowns do not reduce overall energy consumption. Lockdowns only affect mobility.

Carbon is emitted whether it's the energy being used to heat your home work space or the carbon footprint left from sending an email that typically would have been an in-person conversation. Furthermore, with the fear of COVID-19 transmission, there has been an unprecedented decrease in mass transit ridership. This continued decrease will have a dramatic effect on carbon emissions as more people opt to buy cars and steer clear of rideshare options.

Virtual Meeting
Our expert panel examines the hidden costs of remote work during a global lockdown. When COVID-19 brought the world to a standstill, it was thought that carbon emissions would be reduced. We are now finding that is not the case.
Apr
20
2021
Add to Calendar 04/20/2021 01:00 PM 04/20/2021 02:30 PM America/New_York Resilience 2021: How to Stay Safe as Lockdowns Lift and Buildings Reopen

Many buildings have sat empty for the better part of a year.

What are the possible health risks that people face with returning to these unoccupied spaces? Our panel of experts will discuss this and how they see the building industry recalibrating itself to adjust to a post-pandemic world.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports the temporary shutdown or reduced operation of a building and reductions in normal water use can create hazards for returning occupants. These hazards include mold, Legionella (the cause of Legionnaires’ disease), and lead and copper contamination.

The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted nearly every industry, the way business will be conducted moving forward has fundamentally changed across the board. The building industry must consider transformational initiatives to thrive beyond this pandemic. Our mission now is not only building resilient buildings but a resilient industry as well. In this installment of the Resilience 2021 series, we will discuss:

  • Health risks unoccupied buildings pose
  • Proper water and plumbing protocols
  • UV light decontamination
  • Intelligent buildings and the utilization of AI
Virtual Meeting
What are the possible health risks that people face with returning to these unoccupied spaces? Our panel of experts will discuss this and how they see the building industry recalibrating itself to adjust to a post-pandemic world.
May
11
2021
Add to Calendar 05/11/2021 01:00 PM 05/11/2021 03:00 PM America/New_York Building Codes: The Science that Shows They Work and Why They Are So Important

FEMA Region 5 presents the next webinar in the Strategic Partnerships Series. May is Building Safety Month, so we are bringing you two experienced professionals in the area of building codes research, building codes adoption and setting your sights on resilience. Jiqiu (JQ) Yuan, PE, PhD, PMP, with the National Institute of Building Sciences, and Mr. Ryan M. Colker, J.D., CAE, will speak to what community decision makers should know about building codes and how to build supportive partnerships in the research, public and private sector.

Virtual Meeting
FEMA Region 5 presents the next webinar in the Strategic Partnerships Series. May is Building Safety Month, so we are bringing you two experienced professionals in the area of building codes research, building codes adoption and setting your sights on resilience.
May
18
2021
Add to Calendar 05/18/2021 01:00 PM 05/18/2021 02:00 PM America/New_York Resilience 2021: Extreme Weather and Rising Sea Levels Cause More Flood Damage Every Year. What Can We Do?

Floods are the most common and widespread of all weather-related natural disasters. According to testimony from Federal Emergency Management Agency representative Michael Grimm, flood damage cost approximately $17 billion each year between 2010 and 2018. Rising sea levels and extreme weather could cause $20 billion of flood damage to at-risk U.S. homes this year, rising to $32 billion by 2051, according to recent research by flood research non-profit First Street Foundation.

There are many causes of flooding. They include heavy rains, storm surge, quickly melting snow, and breaks in dams or levees. A flood can occur within minutes and last a long period of time. No state or territory in the U.S. is spared, and tragically, floods kill more people in the U.S. than tornadoes, hurricanes or lightning.

In this installment of the Resilience 2021 series, we will cover:

  • Flood resilience and mitigation efforts
  • The National Flood Insurance Program
  • Flood risk in the Continental U.S.
Virtual Meeting
Floods are the most common and widespread of all weather-related natural disasters. According to testimony from Federal Emergency Management Agency representative Michael Grimm, flood damage cost approximately $17 billion each year between 2010 and 2018.
Jun
23
2021
Add to Calendar 06/23/2021 01:00 PM 06/23/2021 02:00 PM America/New_York Resilience 2021: The 2020 Hurricane Season Saw a Record Number of Storm Formations—What’s in Store for 2021?

Will the 2021 Atlantic Hurricane Season be a record breaker? Meteorologists from Colorado State University’s Department of Atmospheric Science anticipate a highly active season, predicting 17 named storms and eight hurricanes—four of which they predict will be Category 3 or higher. The Weather Channel’s prediction is slightly different with 18 named storms and eight hurricanes—three of which it expects will be Category 3 or higher.

In 2020, the Atlantic Hurricane Season saw a historic year with 30 tropical storms, which included 14 hurricanes. The worst storm to make landfall was Hurricane Iota, a Category 5 storm that packed 160 mile-per-hour (mph) winds.

The season begins June 1 and runs through November 30. With storms forming as early as May, it is never too early to start preparing. Please join us as we discuss:

  • Hurricane risks and mitigation
  • Factors for storm strength
  • Future of the Atlantic Hurricane Season
Virtual Meeting
Will the 2021 Atlantic Hurricane Season be a record breaker? Meteorologists from Colorado State University’s Department of Atmospheric Science anticipate a highly active season, predicting 17 named storms and eight hurricanes—four of which they predict will be Category 3 or higher.
Jul
13
2021
Add to Calendar 07/13/2021 01:00 PM 07/13/2021 02:00 PM America/New_York Resilience 2021: The Pandemic’s Impact on Technology in the Built Environment

The Pandemic Accelerated the Move to Virtual Work Environments. The Built Environment Adapted and Excelled with New Technology.

The COVID-19 crisis presented architecture, engineering and construction companies with an enormous challenge: transitioning an industry long reliant on personal relationships and in-person connections to a remote, digital environment. Like other hands-on sectors, builders and other trades can’t ply their trades over Zoom. However, the pandemic accelerated the need to bring building sites into the digital era through automated tools. Digital technology played a critical role in getting the $11 trillion construction industry back on its feet. The shift seen in the building industry not only shows its resilience, but it is one of the major positive changes to emerge from the crisis.

Join us for the next installment of the Resilience 21 webinar series as we discuss:

  • Safety and efficiency of virtual inspections
  • Carbon footprint reductions
  • Building codes & standards in a digital environment
Virtual Meeting
The COVID-19 crisis presented architecture, engineering and construction companies with an enormous challenge: transitioning an industry long reliant on personal relationships and in-person connections to a remote, digital environment. Like other hands-on sectors, builders and other trades can’t ply their trades over Zoom.